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Research Report 132 Environmental management for roading contractors: III. Provisional guidelines for environmental management during road works

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

This project was undertaken in 1997–98 to prepare two sets of provisional environmental guidelines for roading contractors carrying out road works in New Zealand.

Research Report 175 Effects of multiple presence & monitoring period on bridge health monitoring

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

Bridge health monitoring is a method of evaluating the ability of a bridge to perform its required task (also called fitness for purpose) by monitoring the response of the bridge to the traffic loads it has to withstand.

Research Report 217 Natural hazard risk management for road networks: Part I: risk management strategies

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

Road networks are lifelines for the community and are essential for the economic well-being of New Zealand. Significant natural hazard events can also cause widespread disruption to transportation, leading to significant repair costs to road controlling authorities, access difficulties for emergency services, and disruption to road users, tourists and the community at large.

Research Report 258 Detailed experimental investigation for foamed bitumen stabilisation

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

As the demand for a cost-effective and environmentally friendly pavement stabilisation method increases, so has foamed bitumen stabilisation for unbound granular pavement layers started to gain broad acceptance worldwide.

Research Report 341 The prediction of pavement remaining life

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

The primary objective of the project was the development of criteria to define the end-of–life condition of pavements. These criteria could then be used in pavement performance modelling to obtain a more robust measure of remaining life. Another objective was the generation of a new model for maintenance costs. This could then be combined with the existing models for roughness and rutting to define a distress level at which rehabilitation should occur. None of the maintenance cost models developed were particularly successful in producing a reliable prediction of maintenance costs based on the pavement characteristics available from RAMM. Therefore, a logit model was developed to predict rehabilitation decisions. The major factors in the rehabilitation model were maintenance costs, traffic levels and roughness. The rehabilitation decision model derived for this study predicted rehabilitation decisions well. Approximately 72% of pavements that had been rehabilitated were predicted as requiring rehabilitation.

Research Report 383 Measurement of the reflection properties of road surfaces to improve the safety and sustainability of road lighting

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

This study reports on a New Zealand-wide evaluation of road surfaces for reflection properties relevant to road lighting design. The sections of road to be surveyed were chosen from the national Road Assessment and Maintenance Management database (RAMM) on the basis of location, age and surfacing material. The measurement device was the portable reflectometer known as ‘Memphis’. Road lighting for safety in New Zealand is currently based on the Australian and New Zealand standards AS/NZS 1158.1.1:2005 and AS/NZS 1158.2:2005, and use modified CIE tables of pavement reflectance based on New Zealand measurements made in 1982.

Research Report 424 Design moisture condition guidelines for pavement design and material assessment

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

A pavement design model developed in the USA is used to estimate the equilibrium degree of saturation in pavement subgrade and basecourse materials. The model is applicable to all the mainland US states, including areas with similar climatic conditions to New Zealand. The research on which this report is based, which was carried out in 2008/09, indicates that the US-based model is appropriate to New Zealand conditions, where typical equilibrium moisture conditions are in the range of 50–60% for granular basecourse and typically greater than 85% for fine-grained subgrade soils.

Research report 466 High-stress corners

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

A programme of research was undertaken to better understand chip loss on curves with the aim to improve chipseal design and selection practices. The research involved on-road measurements and computer simulation of tyre forces during cornering manoeuvres; correlation analysis using road surface, road geometry and traffic variables contained in the NZ Transport Agency's RAMM database; and finite element analysis of pavement surface stresses induced by a cornering truck.

Research report 507 The implications of road investment

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

The objective of this research (undertaken in 2010–12) was to provide improved evidence (potentially leading to improved modelling, monitoring and evaluation methods) on the implications of major road investments in New Zealand on significant factors including travel demand, operational performance, environmental effects, emissions, road safety, development patterns and economic effects.

Research Report 055 A model to predict logging traffic and associated pavement loading from New Zealand forests

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

A computer model was devised in 1993 to predict heavy traffic flows generated by the operations arising from the 30-year planning period of a production forest (from planting to harvest) in New Zealand, for an area served by a road network. Economic strategies are suggested.
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