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Research Report 217 Natural hazard risk management for road networks: Part I: risk management strategies

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

Road networks are lifelines for the community and are essential for the economic well-being of New Zealand. Significant natural hazard events can also cause widespread disruption to transportation, leading to significant repair costs to road controlling authorities, access difficulties for emergency services, and disruption to road users, tourists and the community at large.

Research Report 134 Risk assessment techniques for optimising slope-failure preventative maintenance programmes

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

A North American method for establishing an optimised slope-failure preventive maintenance programme for use by roading authorities has been identified and trialed by way of a case study, to determine its application to New Zealand roads, The method requires a knowledge of the slope instability, and accident and maintenance history affecting the site. This information can be used to quantify the risk to road users from adverse slope instability affects, and to identify and cost a range of preventative maintenance programmes which could be implemented to mitigate the risk. A study was carried out in 1997–98 on a length of State HIghway 73 (Christchurch to Arthur's Pass) to verify the suitability of the method for New Zealand roads. The existing slope-failure maintenance programme at the study area, involving detritus clearing and call outs to remove rockfall material from the road, appears not to be the optimum when considered in terms...

Research Report 135 A risk assessment procedure for optimising slope-failure preventative maintenance programmes

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

A methodology has been developed, based on a study carried out in 1998–99, to assist in selecting optimum slope-failure preventive maintenance programmes for highways. The existing risk to road users from slope instability is first quantified, then the effectiveness of maintenance programmes in reducing the risk to road users is determined and the mitigated risks quantified. The risks are expressed in economic terms and the implementation costs associated with each programme are incorporated into the analysis. The technique allows for the consideration of uncertainty in various input parameters (both geotechnical and economic). Monte Carlo simulation allows analysis outputs to be expressed in terms of probability distributions. The uncertainty associated with the analysis outcome may therefore be quantified, leading to better informed decision-making and prioritisation of expenditure. A Microsoft Excel 97 file has been developed to allow the technique to be applied to a range of slope stability situations.

Research Report 222 Natural hazard risk management for road networks: part II: implementation strategies

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

Road networks are lifelines for the community and are essential for the economic and social well-being of New Zealand. Significant natural hazard events can cause widespread damage to transportation networks, leading to significant repair costs to road controlling authorities, access difficulties for emergency services and disruption to road users and the community at large.

Research Report 272 Standardisation of design flows for coastal catchments in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

As one of the outputs from the Transfund research project Standardisation of Design Flows and Debris Control Intake Structures, the purpose of this report is to provide further information for the bridge and culvert designer on hydrological approaches that are appropriate to the estimation of design flows in low-lying coastal catchments. Keywords: catchment, coastal, debris control, design flow, hydrology, New Zealand, residential zone, roads, rural zone, transport, urban, urbanisation

Research Report 355 Engineering lifelines and transport – should New Zealand be doing it better?

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

This project examined New Zealand engineering lifelines activity, its level of integration in road controlling authority management practices, and its relationship to the resilience of roading networks to natural hazards. It examined and compared lifelines practice at three levels – international, New Zealand regions and individual road controlling authorities. Relative risk exposures arising from natural hazards and their impacts on regions were assessed at a qualitative level, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive lifelines approach throughout much of the country. The project found there were many gaps in practice and that it was difficult to align the effectiveness of expenditure with measures of increased resilience. These gaps present opportunities for improvement, which are described with recommended actions. These include further development of asset management plans, establishing resilience measures, better use of technology for associating hazard events with infrastructural assets, more comprehensive risk management practice and a more proactive approach to...

Research Report 147 Security of New Zealand's strategic roading system

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

The reliable operation of New Zealand's road network is critical to both its economic success and its social development. Disruption to some parts of the network may therefore have a large negative impact on these.

Research Report 148 Risk assessment methods in road network evaluation

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

This study, carried out in 1998, investigates hazards that have the potential to close the Desert Road, which traverses for some 60 km the Central Volcanic Plateau of the North Island, New Zealand, at around 1000 m altitude. It is part of New Zealand's major north-south link, State Highway 1, and it provides a case study for the application of risk assessment methodology to the evaluation of road networks in New Zealand.

Research Report 276 Developing a hazard risk assessment framework for the New Zealand state highway network

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

The New Zealand Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Act (2002) requires all lifelines, including the road network, to be able to function to the fullest possible extent during and after an emergency, and that lifeline providers have plans for such continuity that can be made available to the Director of CDEM if requested. To be able to meet this legislative requirement, road network managers require a comprehensive framework for identifying, evaluating and managing risks to the road network. This risk management framework needs to strike an appropriate balance between capturing the complexities of hazard risks to the road network, and the need to be cost-effective, achievable, and likely to be taken up and actively used by those people managing the road network. Keywords: hazard, risk management, risk assessment, road, road closure, State Highway

Research Report 058 Seismic assessment of New Zealand highway bridges: development and testing of preliminary screening procedures

Published: | Category: Research & reports , Research programme | Audience: General

A preliminary screening procedure for the prioritisation of New Zealand State Highway bridges is presented. The procedure is designed to identify bridges which justify detailed assessment of their earthquake resistance. The derivation of the procedure is described and the source material is listed. The results of a pilot application carried out in 1994 of a preliminary version of the screening procedure are presented. The pilot application considered 29 bridges on State Highway 1 between Bulls and Wellington, North Island. The results from the screening procedure were compared with those from an economic analysis which used base data from an approximate structural assessment. The comparison led to some modifications being made to the preliminary procedures to produce the final version. Results of the comparison and details of the modifications are presented.
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