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Why are you consulting?

The requirements of the new Rule means the Transport Agency needs to consult with local stakeholders, road users and the community. Input from these groups will be considered when deciding to implement the new speed limit and should the Transport Agency agree to the new limit, then the 110 km/h speed limit could be in place as early as the end of 2017.

It is important that communities are enabled to contribute in any decision to make roads more efficient and safe. This includes any local community affected by the speed limit, as well as other entities including other road controlling authorities, the NZ Automobile Association, the Road Transport Forum, NZ Police, and all road user groups considered to be affected by the change.

 

Where are the first two roads that are being considered?

Bay of Plenty

The Tauranga Eastern Link Toll Road (SH2) is a 15km motorway between the Paengaroa roundabout (intersection between SH2 to Whakatane and SH33 to Rotorua) and the Domain Road interchange (Papamoa). The road was opened in August 2015.

Waikato

The Cambridge Section of the Waikato Expressway (SH1) is a 16km expressway between the Cambridge Southern and Tamahere interchanges, bypassing the Cambridge township. The road was opened in December 2015.

Haven’t you already made your mind up?

No. Consultation is an important part of the process when reviewing speed limits and all submissions will be considered.

How can I have my say?

We would like to hear your views on your roads. You can do this by:

Freepost Authority 110 Consultation
NZ Transport Agency
PO Box 973
Waikato Mail Centre
Hamilton 3240

How will you monitor the speed limit to see if it is effective?

The two roads with the 110km/h speed limit will be monitored closely and independent research will be carried out on the implementation and effectiveness. This fact sheet [PDF, 1.9 MB] outlines how the research and monitoring will be carried out.

How will the speed limit on the 110km/h roads be enforced by Police?

Police will apply the same enforcement considerations to 110km/h roads as any other part of the road network. This includes deploying to locations where the road safety risk is greatest. Officers will continue to use discretion in applying enforcement interventions according to the circumstances, with a focus on ensuring people drive in a safe manner and at a safe speed.

Police would like to remind drivers to drive to the conditions, free from impairment and distraction, and make sure everyone in the vehicle is properly restrained. By doing this, you will dramatically reduce the chances of causing harm to yourself and others on the road.

Will heavy vehicles be able to go 90km/h, 100km/h or 110km/h on a 110km/h road?

The current 90km/h speed limit for heavy vehicles and towing vehicles will also apply on 110km/h roads. The roads proposed to change to 110km/h have at least two lanes in each direction, so other road users should be able to safely and easily pass slower-moving vehicles.

90km/h speed limit for heavy vehicles is set under the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004. 90km/h was deemed the appropriate speed limit for heavy vehicles when considering both safety and efficiency. Remembering some heavy vehicles can weigh up to 60 tonne.

Why isn’t the entire length of the Tauranga Eastern Link being made 110km/h?

The Tauranga Eastern Link is made up of two sections; the tolled motorway section between the Paengaroa roundabout and Domain Road interchange and the expressway section between the Domain Road interchange and Te Maunga.
The tolled motorway section of the Tauranga Eastern Link is being considered for the 110km/h speed limit.

The expressway section between the Domain Road interchange and Te Maunga is not considered safe to support 110km/h travel speeds at this time. This section is high volume (30,000 vehicles per day), there are closely spaced interchanges which means that there are a lot of vehicles changing lanes on this length, and there is also queuing of traffic at morning peak times, where we wouldn’t want higher approach speeds.

What is the difference between an expressway and a motorway and a local road?

State highways are those roads in NZ that form a nationally strategic purpose in moving people and goods nationwide. State highways are an asset the Transport Agency manages on behalf of Central Government.

Motorways are access-controlled, high-speed roads that normally have grade separated intersections (i.e. have overbridges or underpasses). Motorways normally exclude pedestrians, cyclists and all animals. There is usually no stopping permitted on a motorway.

Expressways are also high-speed roads, but they may include grade separated, as well as appropriately spaced ‘at-grade intersections’ – which means they often have accesses and driveways on to them and sometimes traffic signals or roundabouts. Some expressways also allow cyclists.

Local roads are those roads that form a regionally strategic purpose in moving people and goods within regions. These are managed by local government (councils).

How will you monitor the speed limit to see if it is effective?

The first projects rolled out for 110km/h will be monitored closely and independent research will be carried out on the implementation and effectiveness.

Are you already carrying out research?

Yes. The Transport Agency is monitoring speeds that the people are travelling on the Tauranga Eastern Link Toll Road and Cambridge Section of the Waikato Expressway. We are also monitoring traffic volumes and vehicle types per lane.

Won’t a higher speed limit mean more crashes?

The speed limit will only be increased to 110km/hr on roads which can support higher travel speeds without compromising safety. These roads will be designed, constructed, maintained and operated to the necessary standards for the 110km/h travel speed. These are our very best roads with safety features that significantly reduce the chance of a serious crash. For example, median-barriers and two lanes in each direction will prevent head-on collisions – a primary cause of very serious crashes. If crashes do occur we don’t expect them to result in death or serious injury due to the supporting safety infrastructure along these roads.

Can all roads be considered for 110km/h?

The speed limit will only be increased to 110km/hr on roads which can support higher travel speeds without compromising safety. These roads will be designed, constructed, maintained and operated to the necessary standards for the 110km/h travel speed. The priority will be looking at roads where changes to travel speeds will have the greatest impact on economic productivity while supporting safety outcomes. 110km/h is the upper limit and like all speed limits is a maximum not a target. Drivers are expected to adjust their travelling speeds depending on the weather conditions and environment.

What are the current average speeds and number of vehicles on the two roads?

RoadCurrent average speeds*Current traffic volumes**
Tauranga Eastern Link Toll Road (SH2):
from the Paengaroa roundabout to the Domain Road interchange.
100km/h
(14–20 September 2017)
10,055 vpd
(September 2017)
Cambridge section of the Waikato Expressway (SH1):
between the Cambridge Southern and the Tamahere interchanges
102km/h
(11–17 August 2017)
14,930 vpd
(September 2017)

* 7 day mean (average) speed.
** 7 day average vehicles per day.

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