COVID-19 SERVICES UPDATE: Information for all alert levels, Waka Kotahi services and more

SCAM ALERTS: Report a phishing scam or learn about the latest phishing emails

ONLINE SERVICES: We currently have an issue with receiving some payments and are working to resolve this issue as quickly as possible. We apologise for any inconvenience.

EASTER WEEKEND – PLAN AHEAD: Heading away for the long weekend? Check our holiday journeys tool(external link)

SCAM ALERTS: Refund email and Vehicle licence (rego) renewal phishing emails

Project introduction

This project replaced the one-lane bridge and improved the road network on State Highway 10 at Taipā in Northland, with the aim of creating a safe environment for the local community and the many visitors to the area.

  • Estimated project cost

    $21.5 million
  • Project type

    Bridge replacement
  • Project status

    Completed

Project summary

The new two-lane bridge at Taipā opened in October 2019, in time for the busy summer period. The new bridge is 107 metres long, with two lanes of traffic and a 2.5 metre walking and cycling shared path.

Taipā Bridge’s location on Northland’s main tourist connection, the Twin Coast Discovery Route, means it plays a critical role in the local economy. During the peak visitor season, traffic demand is higher than usual and at the previous one-lane bridge there were regular delays and safety concerns.

The new bridge has alleviated these and improved traffic flow and safety for those walking or cycling. Additional roading and town centre improvements are benefitting the local community as well as people passing through.

The road through Taipā (State Highway 10) plays an important role as an alternative route to use if State Highway 1 is closed. This project has helped improve the resilience of the route.

Working with our Treaty partners

The new bridge’s most striking features are the waka tauihu (prow) and taurapa (stern) panels of a seafaring waka adorning each end. These acknowledge Taipā as one of the first landing places in New Zealand of the Polynesian explorer Kupe.

The waka hourua (a traditional double hulled sailing canoe) design and the pou whenua were the result of extensive collaboration between Waka Kotahi and the local hapū representatives of Ngāti Kahu. 

The close relationship with Ngāti Kahu also saw the relocation of a monument commemorating local fallen soldiers from the shop carpark to a more prominent location near the bridge.

Video update

December 2019

View all video updates

Our partners on this project