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peka peka interchange banner

Project introduction

This project investigated connections to and from the Kāpiti Expressway in the area between Peka Peka and Ōtaki River.

  • Project type

    Road improvements
  • Project status

    Revoked

Project updates

Peka Peka interchange not proceeding
Media release,
Peka Peka Connectivity Single Stage Business Case
Business case, (PDF)
Connecting Peka Peka – short list options
Project updates, (PDF)
PP2Ō information days – October 2017
Project updates, (PDF)

Related projects

About the project

The Transport Agency investigated options for improving connections to and from the Kāpiti Expressway in the area between Peka Peka and Ōtaki River.

As part of these investigations, we worked with representatives from well-established stakeholder groups to identify options. The stakeholder groups include Kāpiti Coast District Council, iwi, community liaison boards and other community groups.

We also identified options and sought feedback from local communities at two information days in October 2017.

Once a preferred option was identified, a Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) was developed.

On Thursday 24 January 2019, after an internal review of the Peka Peka Interchange Business Case, we announced our decision not to proceed with a full interchange at Peka Peka.

This decision was made following a review of the project, which found that it does not strongly align with the priorities in the Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Land Transport. The GPS commits to four clear priorities: a safer transport network free of death and injury, accessible and affordable transport, reduced emissions and value for money.

It was also recognised that the Peka Peka to Ōtaki Expressway (PP2Ō) will address some of the issues that the community and stakeholders had identified during our investigative work.

Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) [PDF, 4.4 MB]
Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Land Transport(external link)
Peka Peka to Ōtaki Expressway (PP2Ō)

Background

The Mackays to Peka Peka Expressway opened to traffic in February 2017.

Local access to and from the new expressway is via two full interchanges at Kāpiti Road, and Te Moana Road, plus northbound and southbound ramps at the northern and southern tie-ins to the existing SH1. The partial interchanges are south-facing ramps at Poplar Avenue, and north-facing ramps only at Peka Peka, where provision was made for south-facing ramps in the future.

After the Mackays to Peka Peka Expressway opened, we monitored traffic flows across the network. Some issues with safety and traffic movements around the Peka Peka interchange area were identified and we are now investigating these in collaboration with our stakeholders.

Mackays to Peka Peka Expressway (M2PP)

Frequently asked questions – updated 28 January 2019

  • Why is this interchange not going ahead now, given all the effort put into consultation on options?

    On 30 June 2018, the Government approved a new Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Land Transport that signals a new direction for land transport investment in New Zealand. The GPS strongly influences which projects and programmes of work the NZ Transport Agency progresses and when.

    To deliver on the GPS, the Transport Agency has developed a National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) that outlines a three year investment package to ensure transport can be delivered nationally, regionally and on a local authority level.

    Unfortunately the Peka Peka Interchange does not have a strong alignment to the current GPS.

    The business case has identified that any safety concerns in the area will be addressed by the Peka Peka to Ōtaki Expressway (PP2Ō) project. It also identified that the population size of Peka Peka, travel time benefits and cost of construction does not offer good value for money.

    The Transport Agency acknowledges and greatly appreciates the effort and input from the community in developing preferred options for the interchange.

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  • What will happen to traffic on local roads without the full interchange in place?

    It is expected that when complete, the PP2Ō Expressway (PP2Ō) will have the effect of lowering traffic volumes on Peka Peka Road.

    The old state highway between Peka Peka and Ōtaki will become a local road and traffic volumes will fall significantly (in the order of 80%). The majority of the traffic using the current state highway in this area will move to the new expressway.

    Traffic from Peka Peka to the Waikanae township on the old SH1 road will also be less than half of its pre-2015 levels.

    Once traffic is moved onto the new PP2Ō expressway, a median barrier will prevent the current issue of vehicles attempting U-turns on SH1 at Te Hapua Road intersection. New directional signage will assist northbound traffic onto the new expressway from Peka Peka Road.

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  • Isn’t the project necessary for health and safety reasons?

    No. Evidence gathered for the business case does not suggest that there are any significant safety problems with regards to crashes on the local road network routes used by the Te Horo and Peka Peka communities.

    The current situation with residents performing U-turns at Te Hapua Road intersection will be resolved as construction of the PP2O project advances to the south. Furthermore, U-turns will be removed entirely with the introduction of a central wire rope barrier as part of the final design for PP2O.

    Close

Frequently asked questions

  • Why didn’t you build a full interchange at Peka Peka when you built the Mackays to Peka Peka Expressway?

    The Mackays to Peka Peka Expressway opened to traffic in February 2017. Local access to and from the new expressway is via two full interchanges at Kāpiti Road, and Te Moana Road, plus northbound and southbound ramps at the northern and southern tie-ins to the existing SH1. The partial interchanges are south-facing ramps at Poplar Avenue, and north-facing ramps only at Peka Peka. Provision was made for the addition of south-facing ramps in the future.

    When the interchange was designed in 2011, the decision to construct a partial interchange was based on demand modelling which showed there was insufficient demand to justify a full interchange.

    Close
  • What kind of investigation is the Transport Agency doing?

    We are following the single-stage business case path, which uses a streamlined approach to minimise development times and costs. It identifies the preferred option, and consenting comes later. The business case also needs to set out the justification for the project to secure actual funding, so we will be identifying the preferred option and the case for investment.

    In these cases, a single NLTP funding decision will be made by the Transport Agency to develop the activity level business case up to (but excluding) the implementation phase.

    Close
  • Haven’t you looked at this already?

    In 2015, the Mackays to Peka Peka Alliance made some changes to the Peka Peka Link Road. This included some limited work around the need for a future interchange. Aspects of this work are feeding into the business case process.

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  • Who’s involved in the process?

    The Transport Agency is working with well-established stakeholder groups to identify options. The stakeholder groups include Kāpiti Coast District Council, community liaison boards, iwi and other community groups.

    We want these key stakeholders to help us answer two key questions:

    1. Is additional connectivity justified?
    2. If yes, where should additional connectivity be provided?
    Close

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