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A shared pathway: the Mackays to Peka Peka cycleway, walkway and bridleway

The Expressway includes a 16 kilometre shared cycleway and walkway, with bridleway sections, running alongside the 18 kilometre Expressway. The shared pathway ties in with local roads and existing cycle tracks and walkways. Interpretive signage and information about the area each section runs through, will be added along the route during 2017. There is a 3 metre-wide (sealed and unsealed in places) for cyclists and pedestrians, with a 1 metre wide grass pathway for horses and riders in most sections. The shared pathway has been designed to accommodate horses, but there are restrictions in some parts and signage will point out the recommended bridleway routes.

Horses won’t be able to use the Raumati or Waikanae road bridges or the two footbridges.

Take a look at the connections on our graphic guide
[PDF, 2.1 MB]

Connections and crossings

The shared pathway connects to crossing points at each of the four interchanges. At the full Kāpiti Road and Te Moana Road interchanges, these are controlled by pedestrian crossing lights.

Poplar Avenue

At Poplar Avenue people can get on the shared pathway to go north. There is a connection here to go south (via Poplar Avenue) on the Greater Wellington Regional Council’s shared cycleway/walkway through Queen Elizabeth Park to Paekākāriki.

Kāpiti Road

Here you connect to the shared pathway from Kāpiti Road on the west side of the Expressway. If you’re already on the shared pathway and you reach Kāpiti Road, you’ll need to push the crossing button, wait for the green man to indicate that it’s safe to cross, and then cross the road to connect to the other entrance to continue along the path. (Because of the traffic volumes in this area, horses shouldn’t use this section of the pathway.)

View larger image [JPG, 888 KB]

Te Moana Road

Connecting to Te Moana Road on the east side of the Expressway, cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders can connect to go north or south – using the Expressway shared path and local pathway routes. Like Kāpiti Road, if you’re already on the pathway and you reach Te Moana Road, you’ll need to push one of the crossing buttons (there is one for pedestrians/cyclists and one for horses). Wait for the green symbol to indicate that it’s safe to cross, and then cross the road to connect to the other entrance to continue along the path.

View larger image [JPG, 979 KB]

Peka Peka

Pathway users can connect here on either side of Peka Peka Road to go north towards Te Kowhai Road, or south to make the most of the 16 kilometres of pathway connections.

View larger image [JPG, 104 KB]

Local connections

The shared pathway connects with local roads throughout the region, including:

  • Access from/via Leinster Ave and Rongomau Lane including the Rongomau footbridge over the Expressway
  • A link from Harry Shaw Way
  • A connection into Fincham Road for horses
  • Access off Raumati Road to the west of the Raumati Road Expressway Bridge
  • A link from Kiwi Road
  • A link to the Wharemauku Stream recreation corridor via Rata Road
  • A connection with the Wharemauku Stream recreation corridor and Wharemauku Stream shared pathway bridge
  • Access via Makarini Street using the Makarini Footbridge
  • Connections with Mazengarb and Otaihanga Roads
  • Access via Kauri Road and both sides of the Waikanae River Recreation Corridor
  • Access via Puriri Road
  • Access via Ngarara Road and the new Ngā Manu Access Road
  • A connection with Smithfield Road Unique east-west connections

 

Unique east-west connections

The shared pathway connects with two footbridges across the Expressway for pedestrians and cyclists (horses are not allowed) at Makarini Street and Rongomau Lane. These footbridges have been designed to be unique, bold and sculptural, with the Rongomau Footbridge taking the shape of an eel. Both footbridges feature two ramps at either end, lighting, transparent balustrades, planting and an anti-graffiti coating. Both have steel coverings to disguise structural elements to help them fit in with their surroundings.

Sharing the path

Shared pathways are created for everyone to enjoy, which means all users need to be considerate of other users. Everyone using shared paths are required by law to use the paths fairly and safely, and to try and not hold anyone up. So while you’re out enjoying this great new addition to what the Coast has to offer, please make sure you:

  • observe all the directional signage which is there for everyone’s safety
  • keep to the left
  • make others aware that you’re there
  • pass each other safely
  • cross roads with care and give way to vehicles.
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