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Results for communities at risk

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Communities at risk register

Published: | Category: Statistics & surveys | Audience: Local & regional government

This document provides a ranking of different communities around New Zealand with regard to selected road safety risks. Approved organisations will use the information contained in the register to support their application for funding through TIO (Transport Investment Online). Note that changes in crash data processing in July 2016 showed a notable increase in the number of alcohol related crashes recorded in the Crash Analysis System (CAS). The change reflected crashes where alcohol was suspected but a breath or blood test result is yet to be received, and is due to an increase in the time taken to update the outcome of these results in CAS. This means that comparing previous registers does not reflect a true picture of alcohol related deaths and serious injuries and caution is needed when analysing trends between registers. For more information or advice, please contact us at relationsroadsafety@nzta. govt. nz

Risk management process manual

Published: | Category: Administration , Manuals | Audiences: Road traffic engineers & consultants, Roading contractors

The risk management process, to be applied to aspects of the NZ Transport Agency's business, is described along with details on roles and responsibilities and communication of significant risks. This version of the manual is a major review of the risk management process to align it with AS/NZS 4360:2004 and to incorporate Z/10 from the Professional Services Proforma Manual. This manual only applies to HNO contracts issued before March 2013. Any HNO contracts issued after that date are governed by the Z44 Risk Management Minimum Standard. Internal NZ Transport Agency risk management processes are now detailed in the Risk Management Framework (available internally).

Research Report 217 Natural hazard risk management for road networks: Part I: risk management strategies

Published: | Category: Natural hazard risk management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Road networks are lifelines for the community and are essential for the economic well-being of New Zealand. Significant natural hazard events can also cause widespread disruption to transportation, leading to significant repair costs to road controlling authorities, access difficulties for emergency services, and disruption to road users, tourists and the community at large. As there is a lack of systematic methods available to consider natural hazards that can affect road networks, and to develop methods for managing the risk, research on a strategy to prioritise mitigation, preparedness planning, and management of the road network was carried out by Opus International Consultants (Opus) in 1999–2000. The report outines methods for developing appropriate strategies to manage the risk. Keywords: natural hazard, New Zealand, roads risk, (risk) management, mitigation

Research Report 311 Energy risk to activity systems as a function of urban form

Published: | Category: Sustainable land transport , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This project aimed to develop analytical methods for assessing energy risks due to a peak and decline in global oil production. Additionally to develop modelling capabilities to link these analyses to urban form. The aim was to provide a new capability for long term development planning. The need for communication between members of the community, councillors and practitioners with diverse backgrounds and interests are realised. Thus, the goal in modelling was to provide accurate risk assessment and clear visual-based communication of results. Keywords: energy, urban form, transport policy, modelling.

Research Report 222 Natural hazard risk management for road networks: part II: implementation strategies

Published: | Category: Natural hazard risk management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Road networks are lifelines for the community and are essential for the economic and social well-being of New Zealand. Significant natural hazard events can cause widespread damage to transportation networks, leading to significant repair costs to road controlling authorities, access difficulties for emergency services and disruption to road users and the community at large. To improve the resilience of the road network to natural hazards, risk management is required. This report, part II of a research study, develops methods of implementing natural hazard risk management at five levels: national, regional, local network, emergency management and project development. The responsibility for implementation is discussed, together with the need for an integrated approach between the five levels. Project risk evaluation is illustrated through examples of risk economic analysis at project and link levels. Road funding policies have a significant influence on risk management.

Research Report 296 Natural hazard road risk management – part III: performance criteria

Published: | Category: Natural hazard risk management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Road networks are lifelines for the community and are essential for the social and economic well-being of New Zealand. Natural hazards cause considerable damage to road networks from time to time and cause widespread disruption to transportation, leading to significant repair costs to road controlling authorities, access difficulties for emergency services, and disruption to road users and the community at large. Currently, we have no guidelines for setting levels of service or performance measures for roads which are subject to natural hazard events. As a result, roads which are subject to natural hazard events have been managed mainly reactively, which has led to high ongoing expenditure in terms of damage costs, disruption costs and adverse effects to the community. This is the third part of a three part research project developed between 2002 and 2005 concerning the management of risks to road networks from natural hazards.

Research Report 516 Detailed observations and validated modelling of the impact of traffic on the air quality of roadside communities

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Detailed observations of air quality and local meteorology were conducted on either side of a stretch of the Auckland southern motorway, and in the surrounding residential neighbourhood. The data revealed emissions from motorway traffic contributed, on average, to a 10% elevation in concentrations of particulate matter at a roadside site relative to a setback site (150m away or more) and to a doubling in concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. National environmental standards for air quality were not exceeded, but international health research indicates that the spatial variation in traffic-related air pollutants observed in this study represent a risk that is not currently accounted for in risk assessments in this country. The observational data captured was used to evaluate four different roadside air quality modelling approaches.

Safer journeys for schools

Published: | Category: Manuals | Audience: Road traffic engineers & consultants

This Safer journeys for schools guide has primarily been developed to provide technical guidance for road controlling authorities and consultant engineers so that they can understand, prioritise and address road safety issues at both urban and rural schools. An additional companion document called Safer Journeys for schools: guidelines for school communities has been developed to provide community focussed guidance for schools and their communities. School intervention priority is identified through a three stage process, incorporating a national priority threshold calculation process, regional‐based desktop analysis and a detailed on‐site assessment to ensure all key issues and concerns by the school community are considered. Following this process, specific recommendations can be developed by using a toolbox of measures that have been specifically designed for school environments as well as other measures that are designed for rural roads and urban streets in general.

Research Report 271 School journey safety: a comparative study of engineering devices

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The aim of this research, carried out in 2004, is to improve safety for children on their home to school journey. This is to be achieved by comparing the effectiveness of engineering safety devices used both in New Zealand and overseas, and to provide a framework for the development of a comprehensive toolbox to assist engineering practitioners and the community in selecting appropriate devices. Land Transport Safety Authority (LTSA) crash data indicate that approximately 40% of child pedestrian injuries occur on the home-to-school journey. This report focuses upon engineering devices that can be used as part of an integrated approach to providing safe trips for schoolchildren. Keywords: bus, calming, car, cyclist, device, education, engineering, environment, footpath, geometry, intersection, inventory, legislation, methodology, mode, parking, passenger, pedestrian, risk, safety, safety programme, schoolchildren, security, speed, students, roads, topography, train, traffic, transport, travel, volume, warning, zone

About neighbourhood accessibility plans (NAP)

Published: | Category: Neighbourhood accessibility plans (NAP) , Planning, design, funding, building, maintenance of the transport network , Guidance for specialists | Audience: Local & regional government

Neighbourhood accessibility planning projects aim to give safe access to all ages of pedestrians and cyclists in neighbourhood areas. Neighbourhood accessibility plans involve a council co-ordinator working with various council teams, external agencies and members of the neighbourhood, to determine issues related to walking and cycling. A wide range of solutions, across a broad spectrum of disciplines are planned and implemented. Neighbourhood accessibility planning projects follow a well-established process. The main principles of this process are that they:

bring together key stakeholders to collaborate in addressing safety and access issues
rely on community participation in risk identification, development of solutions, and implementation of solutions
involve and engage all relevant local authority teams
are data and risk analysis based
develop and implement an integrated package of engineering/environmental improvements, enforcement, policy, encouragement and educational interventions that will address locally identified issues involve evaluation that ensures the measurement of all implementation outcomes.