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Research Report 510 Evaluation of the C-roundabout an improved multi-lane roundabout design for cyclists

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The C-roundabout (cyclist roundabout) is a new multi-lane roundabout design (developed as part of a 2006 Land Transport NZ research project Improved multi-lane roundabout designs for cyclists) that aims to improve the safety of cyclists at multi-lane roundabouts and make multi-lane roundabouts more cyclist-friendly. A C-roundabout was installed at the Palomino Drive/Sturges Road intersection in Auckland and was evaluated between 2008 and 2011 in terms of its safety, capacity, and the opinions of cyclists, pedestrians and car drivers. The C-roundabout successfully reduced vehicle speeds to 30km/h, which is close to the speed of cyclists. This made the roundabout safer for cyclists, as well as for other road users. The installation of the C-roundabout at this uncongested site had little impact on capacity. It drew positive feedback from cyclists and pedestrians, but about half of the car drivers were not in favour of it.

Research report 405 Public lighting for safe and attractive pedestrian areas

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The Australian/New Zealand standard Lighting for roads and public spaces, part 3.1: pedestrian area (category P) lighting - performance and design requirements (AS/NZS 1158.3.1:2005) sets out specifications for pedestrian lighting. The standard defines adequate and acceptable pedestrian lighting practices to make walking safe. This research project complements and extends the standard by investigating pedestrian lighting practices to make walking not only safe, but also more attractive. The project highlights issues and perspectives from which to view the effectiveness of the pedestrian lighting. This research is partly based on the observation that most lighting in the public arena has traditionally been driven by the needs of motorists, but pedestrians' needs are different. It studies those differences and guides on lighting techniques that can appropriately and specifically cater for pedestrians. The findings are based on a review of literature incorporated with information from the lighting industry.

Research Report 342 A literature review on driver fatigue among drivers in the general public

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The New Zealand government is seeking to reduce the number of road crashes that arise from driver fatigue in this country. To this end, Land Transport New Zealand commissioned a review of international driver fatigue literature (2000–2007) to assess measures against driver fatigue that would be effective for general public drivers. The review first notes that a number of disciplines study driver fatigue, each using its own definitions and so emphasising different measures. This constrains the development of measures and longer-term programmes for the general public. The review thus notes the need for evidence-based theory specific to general-public driver fatigue. This would enable clearer understanding and facilitate the design, management and evaluation of programmes.

Research Report 344 Personal security in public transport travel in NZ: problems issues and solutions

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project explores concerns about personal security by users of public transport. The findings from an international literature review are used, and the concerns of public transport users in three New Zealand cities (Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch) that have significant public transport patronage streams are explored. Personal security concerns were found to discourage existing patrons from using public transport, and more so after dark. A number of security measures preferred by patrons are outlined. However, the project also found that only a small proportion of patrons actually noticed the presence of security measures that had been installed.

Research Report 517 Use of roadside barriers versus clear zones

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report summarises research carried out in 2011–12 to quantify the effects of roadside barriers and clear zones on mitigation of run-off-road crash numbers and crash severity for New Zealand road and roadside characteristics through statistical and computer simulation modelling. The purpose of the research was to provide practitioners with information that would allow them to make safe, more appropriate and cost-effective treatments for specific conditions.

Research Report 544 New Zealanders attitudes towards drug-driving and suggested countermeasures

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This study conducted in New Zealand in 2012 investigated the attitudes, prevalence, habits and self-reported risks associated with drug-driving, along with possible countermeasures. Telephone and internet surveys were used for a general population sample. Face-to-face interviews, mainly in prisons, surveyed habitual users of four main drug types: alcohol and other drugs, cannabis, methamphetamine and benzodiazepine.

Research report 478 Improved effectiveness and innovation for audio tactile profiled roadmarkings

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The research identified how the physical noise and vibration generated by traversing ATP roadmarkings was influenced by the properties of the roadmarkings, such as their height, width and pitch, as well as by other factors, such as vehicle speed. The research established the relationship of human response to the noise and vibration generated. The physical effects of traversing ATP roadmarkings were determined by measuring the noise (using sound level meters) and vibration (using accelerometers) inside the vehicle while the vehicle traversed a special test strip of ATP roadmarkings, the profiles of which were machined mainly from wood, or from plastic. The driver-response was investigated as a threshold effect via a laboratory-based driving simulation. Participants were played noise effects in controlled conditions from a vehicle driving over different ATP block heights between 2mm and 6mm, and from a vehicle on the road only.

Research Report 312 Safety implications of flush medians in Auckland city: further analysis

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Between July 2004 and February 2006, research was continued on the safety implications of flush medians in Auckland, New Zealand. A site-by-site benefit/cost analysis found that 38% of studied sites achieved a negative benefit/cost ratio, proving that separate analysis is required for every proposed flush median site. The width of a flush median was found to have no effect on overall benefit/cost ratios.

Research Report 545 - The relationship between crash rates and rutting

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Transport demand management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report details research carried out in Wellington, New Zealand, over the period 2012–13. The broad aim was to develop relationships between rut depths and crashes on New Zealand's state highway network.

Research report 428 Trialling pedestrian countdown timers at traffic signals

Published: | Category: Safety, security and public health , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The overall research objective was to evaluate changes in pedestrian safety and traffic efficiency from installing pedestrian countdown timers. The study analysed pedestrian behaviour and safety before and after the installation of a trial countdown timer at the intersection of Queens Street, Bunny Street and Margaret Street in Lower Hutt in July 2007. The results were compared with the 2006/07 trial at the Queen Street/Victoria Street intersection in Auckland CBD and showed very different results. The Auckland city trial indicated that, if placed in suitable locations, pedestrian countdown signals were associated with pedestrian behaviour change that enhanced safety. This study in Lower Hutt demonstrated that the observed pedestrian safety decreased as the percentage of both late starters and late finishers increased, although this was likely to be due to the nature of the intersection with one particularly long diagonal crossing coupled with the allocated phase times.
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