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Research Report 214 Prediction of pavement performance from repeat load tri-axial (RLT) tests on granular materials

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

An accelerated pavement test was conducted at CAPTIF (Canterbury Accelerated Pavement Testing Indoor Facility), Christchurch, New Zealand, between 1999 and 2001, for the purpose of validating the use of the repeat load tri-axial (RLT) apparatus. Both resilient and permanent deformation characteristics of unbound granular materials obtained using this test were compared to the measured results from the pavement test that was run previously. The aim was to ascertain if the few RLT tests that are conducted on unbound granular materials do provide viable results that can be used to predict performance for roads constructed with these materials. The pavement test was subjected to 1 million wheel passes where primarily surface rutting was measured at regular intervals. Strains and stresses were measured within the pavement under a range of tyre loads.

Research Report 280 Effect on pavement wear of increased mass limits for heavy vehicles – stage 4

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Accelerated pavement testing at CAPTIF (Canterbury Accelerated Pavement Testing Indoor Facility, Christchurch, New Zealand) was conducted between 2000 and 2004 on a standard two-coat chipseal that is typically used on New Zealand roads. This report is of Stage 4 of a 4-year accelerated pavement testing programme to assess the effects on pavement and surfacing life, should an increase in mass limits for heavy vehicles be allowed. Accelerated pavement test report series
Research Report 207 Effect on pavement wear of an increase in mass limits for heavy vehicles

Investigates the effect of increase in mass limits on pavement life on four sections that differed only by aggregate type. Research Report 231 Increase in mass limits effect on pavement wear – stage 2

Investigates the effect of increase in mass limits on the life of a chipseal surfacing.

Research Report 231 Increase in mass limits effect on pavement wear – stage 2

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

To improve the efficiency of the road transport industry in New Zealand, a range of mass limit increases for heavy vehicles has been proposed. Some of the options for mass increases include increasing the axle load limit, which would inevitably lead to increased road wear. As New Zealand has a mass-distance road user charging regime where the users pay for the road wear they generate, this increased wear is in itself not a problem provided that the charges accurately reflect the wear. At present, road user charges are based on the fourth power law, which was developed from the AASHO road test carried out in the United States in the 1950s.  The pavements and vehicles used for that test differ considerably from those in use in New Zealand today.

Research Report 498 The design of stabilised pavements in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Areas of New Zealand are running out of premium aggregates that meet the demanding specifications used in unbound granular road construction. Stabilising aggregate provides a viable alternative to using premium aggregates. The objective of this project was to improve the sustainability of New Zealand roads via a combination of accelerated pavement tests at the Canterbury accelerated pavement testing indoor facility (CAPTIF) in 2007/08 and 2008/09, and a limited field review of the performance of bound stabilised pavements. A number of recommendations have resulted from this research concerning the design, testing and construction of modified and bound pavement layers.

Research Report 564 Effects of water on chipseal and basecourse on high-volume roads

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audiences: Road traffic engineers & consultants, Roading contractors

The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between permeability of chipseals, waterfilm thickness, basecourse moisture sensitivity, heavy traffic volumes, and premature pavement failure following construction through the use of accelerated pavement testing at CAPTIF. The research has produced some surprising results in that the traditional M/4 basecourse was the worst performer in all cases. However, it must be borne in mind that this research can only be considered applicable to first coat seals, with high water film thicknesses at very high traffic volume.

Research Report 307 Fatigue design criteria for low noise surfaces on New Zealand roads

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Internationally low noise porous asphalts are typically laid on top of structural asphalt layers. In New Zealand structural asphalt is generally prohibitively expensive and porous asphalt is used directly on chipseal-surfaced unbound granular pavements. Two accelerated pavement tests were undertaken at the Canterbury Accelerated Pavement Testing Indoor Facility (CAPTIF) in 2004–2005. The first test was to develop a horizontal tensile strain versus fatigue life curve and establish a relationship between basecourse surface curvature and fatigue life. The second test evaluated the extension of fatigue life by short trafficking before surfacing rather than using enhanced binders in porous asphalt. The outcomes of the project suggest that the Austroads Rehabilitation Design Guide is very conservative in predicting fatigue and that deformation leads to surface failure before fatigue of the pavement occurs. Pavements to be sealed with low noise surfaces could tolerate more deflection if initial trafficking was undertaken.