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Project introduction

This project saw the construction of two bridges and a new 2.5km alignment of State Highway 12 at Matakohe in Northland.

  • Estimated project cost

    $26 million
  • Project type

    Bridge improvements, Road improvements
  • Project status

    Completed

Project updates

Matakohe Bridges project update – December 2019
Project updates, (PDF)
Matakohe Bridge gets its final seal
Media release,
Matakohe Bridges project update – May 2019
Project updates, (PDF)
Matakohe Bridges fact sheet – March 2019
Factsheets,

Project summary

Completed in mid-2019, this project involved a new 2.5km alignment of State Highway 12 in Matakohe to remove tight bends and short straights on the approaches to the two Matakohe Bridges. The old one-lane bridges were replaced.

The longer of the new two-lane bridges is 191m and stands 15m above the Matakohe River. It has six spans, each made up of five concrete supertee beams, and is Northland’s longest supertee bridge. It replaced the old Hardies Bridge.

The second bridge spans Parerau Stream and replaced Anderson Bridge. It is 54.8m in length.

A new intersection was provided for Matakohe township and the iconic Kauri Museum and a partnership with Kaipara District Council saw improved cycling connections for the local community and visitors.

The project improved safety on this section of the Twin Coast Discovery Route, Northland’s main tourist route.

As part of the project, kauri seedlings were planted on a roadside embankment, acknowledging the significance of the kauri industry to the region’s history and as a key driver of tourism.

Working with our Treaty partners

Waka Kotahi worked closely with Te Uri o Hau, who blessed and gifted the two new bridges their names. The longer bridge is known as Piringatahi (bringing together as one) the shorter bridge is known as Te Ao Marama Hou (moving from the past into the future).

Te Uri o Hau prepared the cultural impacts assessment for the project and were involved in the development of the archaeological management plan, landscape design and ongoing monitoring of key construction activities. They also worked with the project team to develop a wahi taonga area for a pou and relocation of a midden.

Video update