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Research Report 281 Effect on pavement wear of increased mass limits for heavy vehicles – concluding report

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The road transport industry in New Zealand has been lobbying for increases in the allowable mass limits for heavy vehicles on the basis that this would give increased efficiency and benefits to the economy. Some of the proposals for increased mass limits involve increased axle load limits which would clearly lead to additional pavement wear. Road controlling authorities, while sharing the industry’s aims for increased efficiencies in the road transport system, are concerned that any additional pavement wear generated by higher axle loads will be paid for, so that the standard of the roading network can be maintained. At present (2005) Road User Charges (RUCs) are based on the fourth power law, which was developed from the AASHO road test in the United States in the 1950s. The pavements and vehicles used for that test differ considerably from those in use in New Zealand today.

Research Report 341 The prediction of pavement remaining life

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The primary objective of the project was the development of criteria to define the end-of–life condition of pavements. These criteria could then be used in pavement performance modelling to obtain a more robust measure of remaining life. Another objective was the generation of a new model for maintenance costs. This could then be combined with the existing models for roughness and rutting to define a distress level at which rehabilitation should occur. None of the maintenance cost models developed were particularly successful in producing a reliable prediction of maintenance costs based on the pavement characteristics available from RAMM. Therefore, a logit model was developed to predict rehabilitation decisions. The major factors in the rehabilitation model were maintenance costs, traffic levels and roughness. The rehabilitation decision model derived for this study predicted rehabilitation decisions well. Approximately 72% of pavements that had been rehabilitated were predicted as requiring rehabilitation.

Research Report 232 Comparison of gyratory & Marshall asphalt design methods for New Zealand pavement mixes

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The historical development of the traditional Marshall and the modern gyratory-based, performance-related asphalt mix design procedures is described. New Zealand is progressively adopting performance-related specifications and implementing performance contracts for road maintenance and construction. Thus, in 2002, asphalt mixes sourced from a range of asphalt manufacturers located around New Zealand were subjected to a comprehensive laboratory testing regime, to determine their volumetric- and performance-related properties, such as modulus. Two sets of asphalt specimens were created, using either Marshall or gyratory compaction procedures, based on existing mix designs. They were then tested by AUSTROADS APRG18 procedures and equipment to provide performance-related data.

Research Report 291 Bitumen durability

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report describes research in 2004 and 2005 aimed at improving the means by which the durability of bitumens manufactured or imported to New Zealand for use in chipseals is assessed and monitored. Bitumen durability refers to the long-term resistance to oxidative hardening of the material in the field. Although, in-service, all bitumens harden with time through reaction with oxygen in the air, excessive rates of hardening (poor durability) can lead to premature binder embrittlement and surfacing failure resulting in cracking and chip loss. Some means of assessing durability by accelerating the process in the laboratory is necessary. However, no internationally accepted ‘standard’ exists for bitumen durability, as for some other bitumen tests (eg penetration). Keywords: bitumen, chipseal, durability, oxidation, pavements, roads, testing

Research Report 463 Development of tensile fatigue criteria for bound materials

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Flexural beam breakage and fatigue tests were conducted in 2008–11 to determine their relationships with pavement fatigue life and tensile strain for a range of New Zealand materials for use in pavement design of stabilised aggregates. The results showed that the tensile fatigue relationships from several fatigue tests under repetitive loading could be approximated by single flexural beam breakage tests. These relationships resulted in significantly longer pavement lives than the Austroads pavement design criteria but still predicted shorter fatigue lives than what actually occurred at the Canterbury accelerated pavement testing indoor facility (CAPTIF) test track, indicating some conservatism in the approach. Further research is required to validate the tensile fatigue design procedure against actual field data. Keywords: aggregates, basecourse, CAPTIF, fatigue, beam fatigue testing, modulus, pavement design, strain, tensile strain criteria, tensile strength

Research Report 227 Comparison of predictive pavement management models (HDM-III HDM-4 NZ dTIMS) for New Zealand conditions

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This report describes the results of a project, carried out in 2000–01, to investigate the enhancements carried out to road deterioration (RD) and works effects (WE) models included in the predictive pavement modelling system, HDM-4, with respect to the HDM-III models used in the NZ dTIMS Setup used now in New Zealand.

Research Report 229 Assessing road-friendly suspensions: implementation feasibility study

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

The objective of this project, carried out in 2001, was to investigate the design of an operational scale device for testing the 'road-friendliness' of heavy vehicle suspensions. This includes an estimate of the cost of manufacturing the device, adapting an existing facility (such as a vehicle testing station) for the operation of the suspension tester, and the running costs associated with the testing device. Two testing regimes were considered; type-approval and in-service compliance.

Research report 401 Rationalisation of the structural capacity definition and quantification of roads based on falling weight deflectometer tests

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Pavement performance modelling for New Zealand roading networks, currently relies on an adjusted structural number (SNP) which is a single parameter intended to describe the performance of a multi-layered pavement structure in terms of its rate of deterioration with respect to all structural distress modes, as well as non-structural modes. This parameter had its origin in the AASHO road test in the late 1950s, before the advent of analytical methods. Hence refinement to keep abreast of current practice in pavement engineering is overdue. This research describes the basis for a new set of structural indices and how these can be used to obtain improved prediction of pavement performance: both at network level and for project level rehabilitation of individual roads. The results are (i) effective use of all the data contained in RAMM, (ii) more reliable assignment of network forward work programmes, (iii) reduced cost through targeting only those sections...

Research Report 335 Performance tests for road aggregates and alternative materials

Published: | Category: Activity management , CAPTIF , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

Aggregates used as base materials in thin-surfaced granular pavements common to New Zealand contribute at least half the wheeltrack rutting and roughness seen at the surface. Currently, no reliable cost-effective measure of an aggregate’s resistance to rutting in specifications exists. Several test methods using the repeated load triaxial (RLT) apparatus were investigated for use in specifications for basecourse aggregates. Rut depth prediction methods and pavement finite modelling were applied to the RLT results to determine traffic loading limits for the aggregates tested. It was found that the average slope from the six-stage RLT test was the best predictor of traffic loading limit and this test was recommended for use in basecourse specifications.

Research Report 508 Improvement of the performance of hotmix asphalt surfacings in New Zealand

Published: | Category: Activity management , Research programme , Research & reports | Audience: General

This research project had the objective of identifying areas where changes could be made in the use of thin layers of asphalt so that improvements in performance could be obtained. The project was not designed to investigate quality issues, but was to concentrate on materials and selection. The project was initiated because the NZ Transport Agency had found that costs of resurfacing using asphalt had escalated and the lives being achieved appeared to be short. This research in this report, which was undertaken between 2007 and 2012, investigated the following areas:
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